Felix Kelly

(1914–1994)

Born in New Zealand and raised in London, Felix Kelly became fascinated with steamboats and paddlewheelers during repeated trips in the Deep South in the 1960s and '70s; he created "Death of a Sidewheeler" — described by one critic as "the spirit of something sinister and ghostlike" — in 1972. Learn more »

The full entry on Felix Kelly is coming soon. 

Felix Kelly’s romantic and surrealistic depictions of mansions, some in stages of overgrown decay, became his signature oeuvre. Writer Amanda Harling said that Kelly painted with “heartbreaking nostalgia.” In the 1960s and 1970s, Kelly painted in the Deep South, specializing in domestic architecture. His themes romanticized declining plantations along the Mississippi River, and they were painted in luminous tones—some with an imaginary steamboat, another of Kelly’s fascinations. Upon Kelly’s death, the British newspaper The Independent said, “the mystical, evocative ambiance which he bestowed upon these houses was enormously appealing.”

 

Cite This Entry

Chicago Manual of Style

Staff of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. "Felix Kelly." In KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana, edited by David Johnson. Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, 2010–. Article published September 12, 2012. http://www.knowla.org/entry/1286/.

MLA Style

Staff of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. "Felix Kelly." KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana. Ed. David Johnson. Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, 12 Sept 2012. Web. 20 Jan. 2017.

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