Richmond Barthé

(1901–1989)

Mississippi-born Richmond Barthé refined his artmaking in New Orleans, where he worked as a houseboy for a wealthy family. His bronze sculpture "The Boxer," created in 1942, measures 19 x 12 x 7 inches, including the artist-signed base. Learn more »

The full entry on this artist is coming soon.

A leading African-American figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Richmond Barthé created chillingly beautiful works found today in renowned collections and public works such as the Toussaint L’Ouverture Monument in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and a sculpture of Rose McClendon for Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater House. He moved to New York City from New Orleans and by 1934 had earned international recognition and two Guggenheim Fellowships. Harlem’s violence prompted Barthé in 1947 to move to Jamaica.

 

Cite This Entry

Chicago Manual of Style

Staff of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. "Richmond Barthé." In KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana, edited by David Johnson. Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, 2010–. Article published September 12, 2012. http://www.knowla.org/entry/990/&view=summary.

MLA Style

Staff of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. "Richmond Barthé." KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana. Ed. David Johnson. Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, 12 Sept 2012. Web. 17 Jan. 2017.

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