Entries Under L

Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum

LSU's Rural Life Museum is an outdoor complex of southern rural vernacular buildings located in Baton Rouge. Read »

Loujon Press

Loujon Press was an avant-garde publishing operation in 1960’s New Orleans that was a pioneer of high-quality, independent publishing. Read »

Louviere + Vanessa

Louviere + Vanessa is an artistic partnership founded by Jeff Louviere and Vanessa Brown in New Orleans in 2004. Read »

Loving, Eugene

Eugene Loving was an artist and etcher who worked in the French Quarter of New Orleans from the 1930s until his death in 1971. Read »

LSU Campus Indian Mounds

The LSU Campus Mounds are two Native American earthworks from the Middle Archaic Period located on the grounds of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. Read »

Lucky Dogs

The weiner-shaped Lucky Dog hot dog pushcarts in New Orleans's French Quarter were the inspiration for the fictional Paradise Vendors in John Kennedy Toole's novel "A Confederacy of Dunces." Read »

Ludeling, John T.

John T. Ludeling served as the chief justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court from 1868 to 1877. Read »

Luster, Deborah

Photographer Deborah Luster eloquently focuses her lens on ugly realities of life in Louisiana: crime and violence. Read »

Luster, Janie Verret

Janie Verrett Luster is a master palmetto basket weaver and cultural preservationist of the United Houma Nation, a state-recognized tribe from southeast Louisiana. Read »

Lynching

Lynching, an extralegal method of maintaining racial ettiquette, has an unfortunate history in Louisiana. Read »

Lyons, Ted

Vinton native Ted Lyons pitched the most winning games in Chicago White Sox history and earned induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Read »

Lytle, Andrew

Based in Baton Rouge, early photographer Andrew Lytle spent a half-century chronicling the quotidian and exceptional events and faces of the city. Read »

Marquis de Lafayette, Gilbert du Motier

The visit of General Lafayette to the United States in 1824–1825 was the occasion for a yearlong celebration unmatched in American history. Read »