Northeastern Louisiana

Bang Bang

Davies, Jimmie -Audio -Bang Bang

"Bang Bang" is drawn from a promotional record sent out in conjunction with the release of Jimmie Davis's 1947 bio-pic Louisiana. It should be noted that this particular version is from a transcription recording, and that it is not the original version. Listen »

There's A New Moon Over Your Shoulder

Davis, Jimmie -Audio -There's A Moon Over Your Shoulder

The hit There's A New Moon Over My Shoulder is drawn from a promotional record sent out in conjunction with the release of Jimmie Davis' 1947 bio-pic Louisiana. It should be noted that this particular version is from a transcription recording, and that it is not the original hit version. Listen »

You Are My Sunshine

Davis, Jimmie -Audio -You Are My Sunshine

"You Are My Sunshine" is drawn from a promotional record sent out in conjunction with the release of Jimmie Davis's 1947 bio-pic Louisiana. It should be noted that this particular version is from a transcription recording, and that it is not the original hit version. Listen »

Ben Sandmel Interview With Brownie Ford -Part 3

Ford, Brownie -Oral History -Ben Sandmel Interview With Brownie Ford -Part 3

Brownie Ford relates a story about how George Jones helped him out with a broken amplifier during one Fourth of July weekend, in Beaumont, Texas. Listen »

Ben Sandmel Interview With Brownie Ford -Part 1

Ford, Brownie -Oral History and Musical Recording -Ben Sandmel Interview With Brownie Ford -Part 1

Ben Sandmel introduces Brownie Ford who begins his set with Wayne P. Walker's "Only The Hangman Is Waiting For Me". Listen »

Ben Sandmel Interview With Brownie Ford -Part 2

Ford, Brownie -Oral History and Musical Recording -Ben Sandmel Interview With Brownie Ford -Part 2

Brownie Ford performs the traditional ballad "John Henry", about folk hero John Henry and his premonition that steel-driving would lead him to his death. Listen »

Ben Sandmel Interview With Brownie Ford -Part 4

Ford, Brownie -Oral History and Musical Recording -Ben Sandmel Interview With Brownie Ford -Part 4

Brownie Ford performs the old traditional ballad "On the Banks of the Pontchartrain". Listen »

Great Balls Of Fire (Excerpt)

Lewis, Jerry Lee - Musical Recording -Great Balls Of Fire (Excerpt)

"Great Balls of Fire" was written by Otis Blackwell and Jack Hammer. It was recorded by Jerry Lewis at Sun Studios, on October 8, 1957, and released as a as Sun 281 in November 1957. It was also featured in the 1957 movie "Jamboree". The song reached #2 on the Billboard pop charts, #3 on the R&B charts, and #1 on the country charts. It also reached #1 on the UK pop charts. Listen »

Crazy Arms (Excerpt)

Lewis, Jerry Lee -Musical Recording -Crazy Arms (Excerpt)

Written by Ralph Mooney and Charles Seals, "Crazy Arms" went on to become a honky-tonk standard. The song reached No. 1 on Billboard magazine's country music charts, and has been covered by many artist including Chuck Berry, Gram Parsons, Willie Nelson, Patsy Cline and Jerry Lee Lewis. Listen »

High School Confidential (Excerpt)

Lewis, Jerry Lee -Musical Recording -High School Confidential (Excerpt)

"High School Confidential" was co-written by Jerry Lee Lewis and Ron Hargrave. It was released in 1958,  as a Sun 296, backed with "Fools Like Me", and reached No. 21 on the Billboard Hot 100, No. 9 on the country chart, No. 5 on the R & B chart, and No. 12 on the British pop charts. The song was also certified Gold by the RIAA, and featured in the movie of the same name. Listen »

Jambalya (On The Bayou) (Excerpt)

Lewis, Jerry Lee -Musical Recording -Jambalaya (Excerpt)

Originally released in July 1952 by singer-songwriter Hank Williams, the song's melody is based on the Cajun tune "Grand Texas", and has become a staple of Cajun culture. Listen »

Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On (Excerpt)

Lewis, Jerry Lee -Musical Recording -Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On (Excerpt)

The writing of "Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On" is credited to African American singer-songwriter Dave "Curlee" Williams, and white pianist, bandleader and songwriter James Faye "Roy" Hall. Big Maybelle and Big Mama Thorton were amongst the many artists that recorded the song before Jerry Lee Lewis did his own cover at Sun Studios in February of 1957. Released as Sun 267 in May of 1957, the song reached number three on the Billboard pop charts, and number one on the R&B charts. The single also went to number one on the country charts, and number eight in the UK. As a result, Lewis became an overnight sensation. Listen »